Keep Point Grey Road open to all commuters

City of Vancouver wants to close Point Grey Road, a secondary arterial road, to car commuters and turn it into a bike lane and local access road for local residents.  City Hall has put forward two choices: a complete closure or reducing this route to one-way traffic only.

Many resident groups are asking for your support in signing petitions telling Vancouver City Hall and Mayor Robertson to keep PGR open to all commuters.

Residents of Point Grey Road and Macdonald Street neighbourhood seek your support through this petition:
https://www.change.org/petitions/city-of-vancouver-stop-the-bike-lanes

Residents of University Lands that rely on this route to access downtown and North Shore ask for your support through this petition:
https://www.change.org/en-CA/petitions/city-of-vancouver-mayor-gregor-robertson-leave-point-grey-road-open-to-commuter-vehicle-traffic?utm_campaign=mailto_link&utm_medium=email&utm_source=share_petition

PGR arterial route

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Another empty bike lane – cyclists are no-show on Burrard Bridge

Despite all the money poured by Vision Mayor Robertson and all the hype feverishly pitched by Vision Councillor Meggs there are no increases in cycling volumes on high profile bike routes.

Review of the City of Vancouver Downtown Separated Bicycle Lanes Status Report released this July shows that cycling volumes on most established separated bike routes are flat to declining.

source: City of Vancouver,  Downtown Separated Bicycle Lanes Status Report, Summer 2011, Appendix A

Vancouver taxpayers are being fed arrogant hype claiming increases in cycling as a result of separated bike lanes being installed while City’s own data shows decreases in cycling on main cycling routes like Burrard Bridge or the Ontario Bike Route.

Tailgating TransLink

TransLink executives just released their “Cycling for Everyone” plan.  As part of that plan they promote dangerous tailgating as a method to improve space efficiency.  The document signed by the TransLink CEO – Ian Jarvis, states that cyclists can ride so close to each other that they are separated by only half a second.
 Any TransLink bus driver knows that following closer that 2 seconds behind is not safe.  At least 2 seconds are needed to react to a traffic situation.  Fortunately for commuters, executives in charge of TransLink are not driving our buses.  Unfortunately for the taxpayers TransLink executives waste our tax dollars promoting unsafe riding practices.

Disappearing Cyclists – City reports fewer cyclists on a popular bike route

Ontario Bike Route is a popular bike route in Vancouver running north/south through the heart of the City.  Comparing spring and summer months of 2009 and 2010 shows a 15% decline in cycling along that cycling route.

In 5 out of six months there was a reduction in cycling.  Spring months show double-digit drops in cycling exceeding 30% in April of 2010 when compared to 2009.